The DNA and Aging

By studying a premature aging disorder called Werner syndrome, researchers may have uncovered a key driver of normal human aging: loose, disorganized bundles of DNA. The findings were published in Science this week. People with Werner syndrome (also called adult progeria) suffer age-related diseases early in life — from cataracts and graying hair to osteoporosis, […]

via WHY DO WE AGE? — HUMANITY+

Why March for Science?

George Lakoff

static1.squarespace

The enormous role played by science — especially government-sponsored science — in our everyday lives is barely appreciated.

Start with modern medicine. We, the public, paid for it through the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and research universities where the medical researchers, surgeons, doctors and nurses were trained, and where tools like magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) developed. Modern drugs were also developed through basic research sponsored by NIH. Modern medicine is the dividend of our investment over decades in medical science.

Next, computers. Computer science didn’t just appear. It was developed through grants from National Science Foundation (NSF) and Defense Advanced Research Project Agency (DARP). The Internet was developed by the Defense Department. It was originally called the Arpanet. Satellites were developed through NASA, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), and the Defense Department, with vast amount of new science: rocket fuels, physics, new materials for rocket shells, advances…

View original post 407 more words

Wildlife Wednesday: Nomads of the North – Common Redpolls

CutterLight

Regularly occurring in small numbers in the village during this past winter, at times eruptive flocks of dozens of colorful Common Redpolls have descended upon Chignik Lake.

Determining the population status of birds in the Chignik area can be challenging. Common Redpolls (Acanthis flammea) are a case in point. Overall, there are estimated to be about 13,000,000 of these crimson-splashed passerines in Alaska – a number which surely fluctuates considerably from year to year. At home in a range of habitats including Arctic tundra, scrub alder and boreal conifer forests, their call, an electric zapping buzz, is frequently heard from high in the sky even when the birds themselves can’t be located.

In addition to the electric zapping call flying redpolls produce, perched birds have a variety of voices, including a cat-like mew.

*Click to listen to redpolls calling.

But how common are redpolls on the Alaska Peninsula? They aren’t included among the over 200…

View original post 403 more words

The Yellowstone Ecosystem

EnviroQuest

Happy 100th Year Anniversary to the National Park Service responsible for managing and preserving the national parks, monuments and reservations of the United States. Yellowstone, being the first national park, was declared a national park in 1872. The U.S. army was originally responsible for managing and protecting the park until the formation of the National Park Service in 1916.

Bison Silhouettes ‘Yellowstone Bison’ © Larry A Lyons

Two previous posts described the landscape and the geological features of ‘Yellowstone National Park’ and ‘Grand Teton National Park’. Both of these national parks are a part of the ‘Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem’.

This post provides a “glimpse” into some of the more iconic wildlife species that inhabit this diverse ecosystem. The intent is not only to provide awareness on some of the behavior of these animals but also to further assess our understanding on the importance of maintaining and developing…

View original post 3,523 more words